BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO. 9

By

Shelby G. Floyd

THE PERFECT WORD

When Jesus Christ sent the apostles out into all the world to preach the gospel to every creature, he attended their ministry with signs and wonders and miracles (Hebrews 2: 3-4). These miracles were designed to confirm the word (Mark 16:17-20).

Not only were the apostles able to perform all of these wonders, but by the laying on of their hands they were also able to impart spiritual gifts to members of the New Testament church. For example, Peter and John, two apostles, were sent down to Samaria to impart spiritual gifts to those who had been baptized for the forgiveness of their sins. Philip, who preceded the apostles to Samaria, was able to work miracles himself; but not being an apostle, be was not able to impart them to others, this being reserved for the apostles (Acts 8: 12-19). Continue reading “BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO. 9”

BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO. 6

By

Shelby G. Floyd

CHRIST AND THE BOOK OF DANIEL

The book of Daniel is another book which has been the object of much criticism by modernist and liberal writers, but our Lord received the book of Daniel as the inspired word of God, and Daniel as its author.

THE ABOMINATION OF DESOLATION
While Christ was discussing the impending destruction of Jerusalem, he made reference to the book of Daniel, giving credit to Daniel the prophet, as the writer:

When you see ‘the abomination that causes desolation’ standing where it does not belong—let the reader understand—then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains (Mark 13:14).

According to Christ, the abomination of desolation was something that his disciples could see with their eyes. The abomination of desolation was something spoken of by Daniel the prophet. Obviously, the destruction of Jerusalem by the Roman general Vespasian and his son Titus, fulfills the abomination of desolation spoken of by Daniel.

DANIEL’S PROPHECY
The reference which Christ makes to Daniel, the prophet, is found in Daniel 9:26-27, which reads:

And after the sixty-two weeks
Messiah shall be cut off, but not for Himself;
And the people of the prince who is to come
Shall destroy the city and the sanctuary.
The end of it shall be with a flood,

And till the end of the war desolations are determined.
Then he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week;
But in the middle of the week
He shall bring an end to sacrifice and offering.
And on the wing of abominations shall be one who makes desolate,
Even until the consummation, which is determined,
Is poured out on the desolate.

From what has been said, we can draw the following conclusions: (1) Daniel was a prophet of God, inspired by God. (2) Daniel, as an inspired prophet, made reference to the destruction of Jerusalem, speaking under the figure of the abomination of desolation. (3) Daniel’s prophecy was literally fulfilled about A. D. 70, when Vespasian, Titus, and the Roman Army, completely destroyed the city of Jerusalem, including the temple of Herod with all of its holy places. (4) Christ received the book of Daniel as the inspired word of God, written by an inspired prophet of God. We must also receive the book of Daniel as an inspired book of God.

Copyright © 2011 2017 Shelby G. Floyd, All Rights Reserved

Shelby G. Floyd
Heartland Church of Christ
1693 West Main Street
Greenwood, Indiana 46142

BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO. 4

By

Shelby G. Floyd

CHRIST AND THE BOOK OF ISAIAH

Previously, we have abundantly proved that Jesus Christ endorsed the inspiration of the book of Genesis, and the rest of the books written by Moses, often called the Pentateuch. It will be our purpose in this article and others to follow to point out that Christ also endorsed the inspiration of the prophetical books, the poetical books of David and Solomon, and the historical books of the Old Testament.

Modern critics have denied that Isaiah wrote the book which bears his name. Isaiah spoke about Christ, the Messiah, perhaps more than any other Old Testament prophet. Therefore, we can see why the devil and his henchmen spend so much time trying to deny the authenticity and verbal inspiration of the book of Isaiah. But let us notice the attitude of Christ toward this book. Continue reading “BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO. 4”

BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO 1

By

Shelby G. Floyd

THE BIBLE CLAIMS TO BE INSPIRED

The Bible claims to be the inspired word of God. No more important theme can be considered than the study concerning the inspiration of the Holy Scriptures. Our attitude toward the word of God will determine our attitude toward the authority and commands of the Bible. If one believes in divine revelation and verbal inspiration, then one will have reverence and respect for the authority and commands of the Bible. But on the other hand, if one has doubts and criticisms of verbal inspiration, then this automatically would cause one to question and criticize Biblical authority, and the commands of the Bible. This subject definitely is of vast importance, and demands our keenest attention.

The apostle Paul expressed the proper attitude which all men should hold toward the Holy Scriptures. Paul believed that what he taught the churches was the inspired word of God. When he wrote the church at Thessalonica, he thanked God without ceasing because they had received his teaching as the word of God. “For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe” (1 Thessalonians 2:13). Paul’s teaching then was the word of God because Paul was inspired of God.

The Bible unequivocally claims to be the inspired word of God. However, the word inspiration conveys different ideas to different men. Modernists will tell one that the Bible is inspired, but they mean by this that the Bible is inspired only in the sense that it gives evidence of literary genius, such as, the writings of Milton, Shakespeare and Browning, and others who were truly outstanding men of literature. Let us then define the term inspiration as it is used in the Bible. Continue reading “BIBLICAL INSPIRATION NO 1”

CONCERNING CHRIST AND THE CHURCH

By

Shelby G. Floyd

In Ephesians 5:22-33, the apostle Paul sets forth the nature of the church and its relationship to Christ. He says in one place,

“This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church” (Ephesians 5:32).

What did Paul mean when he said, “I speak concerning Christ and the church”? Continue reading “CONCERNING CHRIST AND THE CHURCH”

TEST THE SPIRITS

By

Shelby G. Floyd

The author of the letter to the church at Ephesus is Jesus Christ (Revelation 2:1-3). This letter is a part of the Revelation which God gave to Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ gave to an Angel, and the Angel signified it to John, John wrote it down in a book and sent it to the churches (Revelation 1:1-2). A great blessing is pronounced upon those who read (aloud), hear and keep those things which are written in the last book of the Bible (Revelation 1:3). John received this wonderful disclosure while he was on the Isle of Patmos. He heard a great voice behind him as the voice of a trumpet, loud, distinct and clear. When he turned to see who was speaking, he saw seven Golden candlesticks; and in the midst of those Golden candlesticks he saw the glorified Christ, like unto the Son of Man, and he had in his right hand seven stars (Revelation 1:9-19). Continue reading “TEST THE SPIRITS”

TULIP

By

Shelby G. Floyd

purple-tulip

John Calvin is credited with originating the false doctrine of predestination and foreordination. He taught that a certain number of people had been foreordained and predetermined from the foundation of the world, to be either saved or lost. The teaching of John Calvin is usually remembered by the acronym T U L I P: Continue reading “TULIP”